Elmhurst Dairy reinvents itself as dairy-alternative beverage brand Elmhurst Milked

By Mary Ellen Shoup contact

- Last updated on GMT

Elmhurst Milked has tapped into the dairy alternative space with the launch of four nut milk varieties, and says it will continue to innovate the category.
Elmhurst Milked has tapped into the dairy alternative space with the launch of four nut milk varieties, and says it will continue to innovate the category.

Related tags: Milk

Elmhurst Dairy closed its dairy business last year after 90 years of producing dairy products for the New York City area, but now CEO Henry Schwartz has completely repositioned the company as Elmhurst Milked, a manufacturer of dairy alternative beverages.

“From a business perspective, we saw the potential in plant-based foods and the enormous room for growth in the industry,”​ Schwartz told DairyReporter.

“We feel strongly that plant-based foods are the future.”

Elmhurst Milked offers Milked Almond, Milked Cashew, Milked Hazelnut and Milked Walnut. Milked Almond and Milked Walnut retail for $4.99 per 32-ounce carton and Milked Cashew and Milked Hazelnut has an SRP of $5.99 each.

The non-dairy products were first available through a direct order system that delivers milk right to consumers' homes, “reminiscent of days when milk was delivered door-to-door,”​ the company said.

The four varieties will be rolling out to more grocery stores and speciality markets across the US. The brand is currently in Publix in Florida and Georgia, and Gelson’s and Bristol Farms in Southern California, with other retailers to follow, according the company.

“Our goal was to create an enjoyable product with a nutrient content on par with the highest quality dairy milk,” ​he said.

All of Elmhurst Milked’s products are non-GMO, gluten free, vegan, dairy free, lactose free and kosher. Elmhurst Milked is packaged in a 32-ounce combidome from SIG Combibloc, a recyclable container that combines the features of a carton and bottle.

‘Milked’ vs. ‘Milk’

Dairy alternative manufacturers have received backlash from the dairy industry for using the term “milk”​ because of the FDA’s definition that any milk product must come from a cow.

The dispute culminated earlier this year with the Dairy Pride Act​ which demands that dairy alternative producers remove terms such as “milk, butter, or cheese”​ from their labeling.

“I have the utmost respect for the dairy industry,”​ Schwartz said. “We use the term ‘Milked’ rather than ‘Milk,’ to describe our patented cold milling process.”

The patented food technology process was developed by food scientist Dr Cheryl Mitchell and is described as freeing the nuts from their fiber structures to produce a naturally creamy liquid without the use of stabilizers or fortification, according to Mitchell.

“Our goal was to create an enjoyable product with a nutrient content on par with the highest quality dairy milk,” ​he said.

“People like myself, who have loved the creaminess and the nutritional value of dairy milk, will now be able to find that in their plant milk.”

Each serving of Milked Almond contains 18 almonds and five grams of protein per eight fluid ounces, the company said on its website.

“We’ve developed an entirely new technology that coerces or ‘milks’ the natural nutrition and compounds from the nuts,”​ Dr Mitchell explained. 

“The plant-based market is prime for a period of great innovation,”​ Schwartz said.

“While we started with nut milks, that’s just the beginning for us.”

Related news

1 comment

.

Posted by Sally,

if it needs to come from a cow to be considered milk... how do you explain things like goat, yak, pig and even dog milk?

Report abuse

Follow us

Featured Events

View more

Products

View more

Webinars