TINE and Synnøve Finden case over Jarlsberg ended

By Jim Cornall contact

- Last updated on GMT

TINE owns the trademark for Jarlsberg, which prevents other companies from using the term Jarlsberg or Jarlsberg-like on other cheeses.
TINE owns the trademark for Jarlsberg, which prevents other companies from using the term Jarlsberg or Jarlsberg-like on other cheeses.

Related tags: Cheese, Emmental

A settlement has been reached between two Norwegian companies over the use of the term Jarlsberg.

TINE, which owns the rights to the Jarlsberg cheese name, and Synnøve Finden, which had initially marketed a cheese that it described as ‘Jarlsberg-type’, have agreed that Synnøve Finden will not market and distribute cheese-products as “kind of Jarlsberg Cheese” or any similar designations.

In addition, Synnøve Finden has agreed to waive the requirement to get the Jarlsberg brand deleted from the trademark register.

Both companies have waived claims for compensation, will cover their own court costs and have agreed to close the case.

Launch of cheese draws response from TINE

The case came to light in January 2016, when Synnøve Finden launched Kongsgård cheese, which it described as ‘Jarlsberg-type’ in spite of TINE owning the trademark to Jarlsberg, which it registered in 1971.

Synnøve Finden argued that jarlsberg cheese had existed for more than 150 years before the TINE trademark.

A Norwegian court found in favor of TINE in February, with TINE saying it welcomed the new Synnøve Finden cheese in the market, but not with packaging that made connections to Jarlsberg.

Subsequent court cases also found in favor of TINE.

Synnøve Finden subsequently removed the references on its cheese.

Related topics: Manufacturers, Cheese

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