EDA protests about ‘nonsense’ nutrition labels at EU Commission meeting in Luxembourg

By Jim Cornall contact

- Last updated on GMT

Alexander Anton, from the EDA, tweeted this image of a soft drink and milk, showing the contrasting ‘traffic light’ information, saying, “nutrition labelling: There is something seriously wrong with a system where a diet coke ranks healthier than semi-skimmed milk !”
Alexander Anton, from the EDA, tweeted this image of a soft drink and milk, showing the contrasting ‘traffic light’ information, saying, “nutrition labelling: There is something seriously wrong with a system where a diet coke ranks healthier than semi-skimmed milk !”
Last week at the joint meeting of the ‘High Level Group on Nutrition and Physical Activity’ and the ‘EU Platform for Action on Diet, Physical Activity and Health’ in Luxembourg, EDA secretary general Alexander Anton officially protested at what the EDA says are “nonsense” nutrition labels.

“For the second time this year, the EU Commission offered a high level platform to a group of six multinationals to present and hence promote their own nutrition labeling scheme,”​ Anton said.

“I know we’re not the only ones questioning the EU Commission leaving the leadership in this dossier to national authorities or to six multinationals: basically, all these schemes may well be very sophisticated, but they’re not based on all relevant science on diets and do in no way reflect common sense.”

‘Seriously nonsense’

The multinationals – The Coca-Cola Company, Mars, Mondelez International, Nestlé, PepsiCo, and Unilever – are putting forward the Evolved Nutrition Labelling (ENL) Initiative, which promotes the traffic light label system.

Anton said that nutrition labeling schemes where a diet soft drink ranks healthier than drinking milk “are obviously and seriously nonsense.”

Anton said he protested and urged the EU Commission to stop any such scheme in place like the UK traffic light and to stop any direct or indirect support for any nutrition labeling schemes that fail what he called the ‘diet soft drink vs drinking milk’ test.

The EDA recently said​the ENL scheme is not adequate for providing information on the global nutritional properties of milk and dairy products. 

Related topics: Regulation & Safety, Fresh Milk

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